Arachnophiliac

Scorpions and Spiders and Snakes, Oh My!

Thursday, 15 February 2007

Welcome!

The Mexican Red-Knee Tarantula

I've finally got round to creating a blog for my website known as 'The Tarantula's Burrow' which I host at 'arachnophiliac.co.uk'. The website has been running for ten years, from 1997 to 2007 and currently gets between half-a-million and three-quarters-of-a-million hits per month.

There are two other blogs I currently maintain, these are 'MoMusings' and 'VSUB'; both of these are related to my line of work, this being malware and anti-malware and related computer/internet security threats.

For those of you that are curious, and don't already know, the picture at the top of the pages is of a 'Mexican Red-Knee Tarantula' also known by its scientific/latin name of 'Brachypelma smithi'.

The tarantula in this picture is what is known as a 'New World Species' as it is found on the American continent. These tarantulas use two forms of defence, one of them is the use of 'urticating' or 'stinging' hairs, which they flick at a would be attacker. The second, and this is only used if really provoked, is to bite the attacker. They may not decide to inject any venom; this is known as a 'dry-bite'.

The bite is painful, but not considered to be medically important to most humans.

As you may have guessed, there are also 'Old World Species' which are found throughout the Africa, Asia, India and other parts of the 'Old World'.

A typical example of this group of tarantulas would be the 'Cobalt Blue Tarantula' [picture below] also known by its scientific/latin name of 'Haplopelma lividum'. Tarantulas from the 'Old World' only have one method of defence, and this is only used if really provoked, is to bite the attacker. They may not decide to inject any venom; this is known as a 'dry-bite'. However, if they do inject venom then these species tend to have 'hotter' venom than many of the 'New-World' species, and in some rare cases you may suffer some symptoms of the invenomation. In these cases medical attention should be sought.

The Cobalt Blue Tarantula

My plan is to blog here as often as I can, not only on topics covering Arachnids [Tarantulas, Spiders, Scorpions, etc.] but also Snakes and Snails [Giant African Land Snails to be precise]. Each of these groups are covered by my website, so please take a look.

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